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Filling the Jar

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Hey,
Jordan,
I'm just chatting with you right now,
but I thought I would show you something that I have,
but I think it's important.
It's called The Art of Filling the Jar.
And I'm sure you know about this for you know,
somebody takes a jar and then they put in,
they put in the rocks and they're like,
Can I put more in?
And they're like,
No.
And then the guy puts in pebbles and the teachers like,
can you put more in? The students are like "No."
So they put sand in and like,
can I put more in And that that whole sort of process is really important to you because you need to know where you're spending your time and how you can optimize feeling that jar with the least amount of resources that you have,
important to you because
you know,
you wanna make money with what you have versus going out and buying like,
ah,
five year program and only needing one month at a time because,
you know,
you just don't need it.
You only need the resources that you need today,
tomorrow,
and well,
preferably for the entire month.
So one of the first most important things you want to consider is your jar size?
You buy a jar that's too big.
And this is why I told you to start with the study room is because if you get a hug one Well,
you're gonna have a really hard time feeling that jar with with kids with students.
Because if you can't get one,
then you have a hard time getting five and you've got a hard time getting five.
You're gonna have a real hard time filling up whole whole school.
So starting with one room,
small class sizes,
perfect.
All right,
but and you've already got that settled.
So now some of the big rocks you're gonna have to put these big rocks inside this course inside this jar and those are your big rocks.
The things that you can't really change will be your courses,
your content from the courses and your schedule once you set a schedule is really,
really hard to change because,
well,
if you do,
people were like,
Well,
he can use wishy washy is not consistent.
He does,
uh,
and it really scares people when people are scared of buying into your courses and your content then you're not gonna make the sale,
so you need to have the courses and the schedule set up.
Next,
we've got smaller little pebbles,
which is your lessons and your goals and objectives.
Your outcomes,
like,
what are you gonna be doing from the course Through your goals and objectives.
Now,
sometimes they're easy to define,
and sometimes they're hard because it's like you're living inside like you think that these are your goals and these air your objectives and the book has them too.
But actually achieving them are sometimes a little bit different,
especially with new students,
and especially when you're doing something that you've never done before.
I mean,
like teaching a new book to new students,
toe a level you've never taught at you.
It's sometimes really hard to know what the future is for them,
because you never you don't have that firsthand experience.
So once you know kind of your lessons and your goals and objectives for those lessons,
then you can start really getting down to the sand.
The fine little details now sand as well it's not as flexible is water,
so you've got your activities and you've got your procedures and you've got your approach.
Now I'm not too sure how familiar you are with with,
you know,
procedure your procedures and approach because I don't really know too much about you.
But you know,
when you nail when you understand why you do and how you do things,
then you can replicate that.
And when you can replicate it,
you can shark that you can shake that sand around and get it between all the little pebbles.
Now,
the last thing on the list which isn't on here is the water and the water is like the stuff that goes everywhere,
and that is the language that you use.
So you're in constant state of analyzing interacting with students and reflecting on how you say things,
Why you say things.
Thio get the best results.
And,
uh,
that's what it is.
It's all about the input,
the output and the feedback.
All right,
so if the better you get it learning how to feel this jar,
the better the the more stability you will have in your business and that to me,
stability is really important.
Because if you don't know how you're doing what you're doing,
then good job.
Good luck replicating it.
It's really hard.
So,
ideally,
you want to feel one jar at a time until you get you know,
the super jar.
But you,
Philip,
one jar at a time,
so learn to love the process of how to fill the jar.
So one of the biggest things that you could do is is to choose your resources carefully.
If you choose a rock,
you know,
and you take it from a mountain full of granite,
that's too hard.
It's like teaching physics to a student who doesn't even know math.
It's going to be really hard next to impossible.
So you need to choose something that's just within the students reach but requires a little bit of scaffolding from you.
The teacher all right.
And that's why levels are very important.
And starting at the start is one of the best levels to start up because the parents don't really have the watch.
McCullough.
They don't have the they don't have the they haven't bought into a program before,
so they don't really have the network of people who are doing the things that they're doing.
They're just new to the game,
and they're open to everything,
but they're not naive.
They're just open.
So next thing you know,
you've got these resources and you have to fit it inside the jar.
So what you need to do is you need a break the bigger block into 10 manageable blocks because you need to have one stone per month because it's just easier to work at one stone.
And this is this is why you actually don't really like textbooks because textbooks put three books into one,
and then you have to schedule all your time around that,
whereas I create monthly courses.
So every month the parents by one course,
it just makes sense.
You know?
Why should I buy a book for three months when parents are only paying me month by month?
Yes,
the parents by it.
But they kind of feel angry sometimes if they come and then they have to leave.
And they only studied a few pages in the book and,
you know,
things get,
you know,
but anyways,
so I can change those sort of rocks into these this kind of format.
Now I also have two to review months.
One month is because I take a month off.
Every year I budget the money that I make teaching these courses to take a vacation.
And I have a review month as well.
Which this is a review review month so that when I go away on vacation that they have some supplemental materials to work on that they could redo these courses that that's online.
So now I've got this one course and now,
like the thing is,
I want to do The thing that I want to do is I want to break this course into small things of sand.
So I want to grind it down.
Lesson by lesson by lesson by lessons so that the students can manipulate the sand to move wherever they want.
And I do that by separating into different strands.
Interact,
read words,
songs,
right,
phonics and homework.
And then I just keep grinding away.
Lesson by lesson.
Okay,
Todo so now the sand.
So the rock is originally inside here,
and when you grind it up,
then you grind the one rock into,
uh,
a bunch of sand,
and it takes up less space.
Well,
takes up the same space,
but it zits more flexible its's.
It fills up more of the jar equally,
and then you just put in the water to help things grow.
But there's what,
uh,
bit by a bit,
you know,
you put in the water,
you talk through target language through interactions through,
you know,
building rapport and stuff like that,
and you will grow your you will grow your school service.
Now there's one more spot that I did not mention here,
and it's something that I'm working on right now.
It's called, "Where you keeping the jar?"
Because you know,
you could keep the jar in a place that nobody ever sees it,
and nobody will know about your awesome service that you're offering.
But if you keep it in the window where people can see it and they can see you constantly filling it up,
filling it up with knowledge with success with knowledge and success,
and people will want to buy your program and because people want to be with successful people who are doing things that are getting the results that they want that Z how it works.
If you don't get the results,
you won't get the students.
And if you can't show that you're getting the results then.
Good luck promoting Good luck with that stability you need toe.
You need to keep the jar in the window so people can see you.
You need to have that word of mouth marketing.
Alright,
Talk you later.
Bye bye.

Hey, Jordan, I'm just chatting with you right now, but I thought I would show you something that I have, but I think it's important.
It's called The Art of Filling the Jar.
And I'm sure you know about this for you know,

somebody takes a jar and then they put in, they put in the rocks and they're like, Can I put more in? And they're like, No.
And then the guy puts in pebbles and the teachers like, can you put more in? The students are like "No.
"

So they put sand in and like, can I put more in And that that whole sort of process is really important to you because you need to know where you're spending your time and how you can optimize feeling that jar with the least amount of resources that you have, important to you because

you know, you wanna make money with what you have versus going out and buying like, ah, five year program and only needing one month at a time because, you know, you just don't need it.

You only need the resources that you need today, tomorrow, and well, preferably for the entire month.
So one of the first most important things you want to consider is your jar size? You buy a jar that's too big.

And this is why I told you to start with the study room is because if you get a hug one Well, you're gonna have a really hard time feeling that jar with with kids with students.
Because if you can't get one,

then you have a hard time getting five and you've got a hard time getting five.
You're gonna have a real hard time filling up whole whole school.
So starting with one room, small class sizes,

perfect.
All right, but and you've already got that settled.
So now some of the big rocks you're gonna have to put these big rocks inside this course inside this jar and those are your big rocks.
The things that you can't really change will be your courses,

your content from the courses and your schedule once you set a schedule is really, really hard to change because, well, if you do, people were like, Well, he can use wishy washy is not consistent.
He does,

uh, and it really scares people when people are scared of buying into your courses and your content then you're not gonna make the sale, so you need to have the courses and the schedule set up.
Next,

we've got smaller little pebbles, which is your lessons and your goals and objectives.
Your outcomes, like, what are you gonna be doing from the course Through your goals and objectives.
Now,

sometimes they're easy to define, and sometimes they're hard because it's like you're living inside like you think that these are your goals and these air your objectives and the book has them too.
But actually achieving them are sometimes a little bit different,

especially with new students, and especially when you're doing something that you've never done before.
I mean, like teaching a new book to new students, toe a level you've never taught at you.
It's sometimes really hard to know what the future is for them,

because you never you don't have that firsthand experience.
So once you know kind of your lessons and your goals and objectives for those lessons, then you can start really getting down to the sand.
The fine little details now sand as well it's not as flexible is water,

so you've got your activities and you've got your procedures and you've got your approach.
Now I'm not too sure how familiar you are with with, you know, procedure your procedures and approach because I don't really know too much about you.

But you know, when you nail when you understand why you do and how you do things, then you can replicate that.
And when you can replicate it, you can shark that you can shake that sand around and get it between all the little pebbles.
Now,

the last thing on the list which isn't on here is the water and the water is like the stuff that goes everywhere, and that is the language that you use.
So you're in constant state of analyzing interacting with students and reflecting on how you say things,

Why you say things.
Thio get the best results.
And, uh, that's what it is.
It's all about the input, the output and the feedback.
All right, so if the better you get it learning how to feel this jar, the better the the more stability you will have in your business and that to me,

stability is really important.
Because if you don't know how you're doing what you're doing, then good job.
Good luck replicating it.
It's really hard.
So, ideally, you want to feel one jar at a time until you get you know,

the super jar.
But you, Philip, one jar at a time, so learn to love the process of how to fill the jar.
So one of the biggest things that you could do is is to choose your resources carefully.
If you choose a rock,

you know, and you take it from a mountain full of granite, that's too hard.
It's like teaching physics to a student who doesn't even know math.
It's going to be really hard next to impossible.
So you need to choose something that's just within the students reach but requires a little bit of scaffolding from you.

The teacher all right.
And that's why levels are very important.
And starting at the start is one of the best levels to start up because the parents don't really have the watch.
McCullough.

They don't have the they don't have the they haven't bought into a program before, so they don't really have the network of people who are doing the things that they're doing.
They're just new to the game,

and they're open to everything, but they're not naive.
They're just open.
So next thing you know, you've got these resources and you have to fit it inside the jar.
So what you need to do is you need a break the bigger block into 10 manageable blocks because you need to have one stone per month because it's just easier to work at one stone.

And this is this is why you actually don't really like textbooks because textbooks put three books into one, and then you have to schedule all your time around that, whereas I create monthly courses.

So every month the parents by one course, it just makes sense.
You know? Why should I buy a book for three months when parents are only paying me month by month? Yes,

the parents by it.
But they kind of feel angry sometimes if they come and then they have to leave.
And they only studied a few pages in the book and, you know, things get,

you know, but anyways, so I can change those sort of rocks into these this kind of format.
Now I also have two to review months.
One month is because I take a month off.
Every year I budget the money that I make teaching these courses to take a vacation.

And I have a review month as well.
Which this is a review review month so that when I go away on vacation that they have some supplemental materials to work on that they could redo these courses that that's online.
So now I've got this one course and now,

like the thing is, I want to do The thing that I want to do is I want to break this course into small things of sand.
So I want to grind it down.
Lesson by lesson by lesson by lessons so that the students can manipulate the sand to move wherever they want.
And I do that by separating into different strands.

Interact, read words, songs, right, phonics and homework.
And then I just keep grinding away.
Lesson by lesson.
Okay, Todo so now the sand.
So the rock is originally inside here, and when you grind it up,

then you grind the one rock into, uh, a bunch of sand, and it takes up less space.
Well, takes up the same space, but it zits more flexible its's.
It fills up more of the jar equally, and then you just put in the water to help things grow.

But there's what, uh, bit by a bit, you know, you put in the water, you talk through target language through interactions through, you know, building rapport and stuff like that, and you will grow your you will grow your school service.

Now there's one more spot that I did not mention here, and it's something that I'm working on right now.
It's called, "Where you keeping the jar? "Because you know, you could keep the jar in a place that nobody ever sees it,

and nobody will know about your awesome service that you're offering.
But if you keep it in the window where people can see it and they can see you constantly filling it up, filling it up with knowledge with success with knowledge and success,

and people will want to buy your program and because people want to be with successful people who are doing things that are getting the results that they want that Z how it works.
If you don't get the results,

you won't get the students.
And if you can't show that you're getting the results then.
Good luck promoting Good luck with that stability you need toe.
You need to keep the jar in the window so people can see you.
You need to have that word of mouth marketing.

Alright, Talk you later.
Bye bye.

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